FAITH FORMATION

Lenten Reflections

1st WEEK OF LENT

2nd WEEK OF LENT

3rd WEEK OF LENT

4th WEEK OF LENT

5th WEEK OF LENT

PASSIONTIDE REFLECTION

Rear Light

‘I wandered lonely as a cloud that floats on high o’er vales and hills’

I’ve always loved this hackneyed poem by Wordsworth, because I love to ‘wander’.  Indeed I was up in Wordsworth’s house one Easter, and it is so easy to imagine simply wandering off into those hills and dales that were so isolated when he resided there.

My Concise Oxford English Dictionary does not give it kind definitions: 1. Go from country to country or from place to place without settled route or destination; go aimlessly; 2. Stray, diverge from the right way (literally or figuratively), get lost, depart from home; 3. Talk or think irrelevantly or diconnectedly or incoherently, stray from subject in hand, be inattentive or delirious.  Half truths hurt, because those who know me have accused me of these things: 1. going aimlessly, 2. divergent and 3. talking or thinking diconnectedly.

I said ‘half truths hurt’, because I want to redeem the word ‘wander’ from its limited definition because I am conscious of the creativity of people I’ve known, besides myself, who enjoy a good wander.  Indeed, to go off aimlessly, diverge from the main route and to be unfocused in thought can lead one into new territory and into ‘wonder’.  An unplanned aimless and thoughtless walk on the coast, in the country, around a graveyard and so many more routes have led me to sit and gasp and take in all sorts of simple experiences and to ponder life in all its myriad meanings – to see in the pointlessness, to hear common sounds afresh, to find an interesting epitaph on a gravestone.  To wander can lead to ponder and before you know it you’re back to another wonder, ‘and all at once I saw a crowd, a host of golden daffodils’.